Honeycutt Hopes To Make History In November

July 24, 2006

Georgia’s 13th congressional district could make history if it elects Dr. Deborah Travis Honeycutt, M.D. as the first Black Republican woman in Congress. The 13th District includes Clayton, Henry, Fayette, DeKalb, South Fulton, Gwinnett, Rockdale, Newton, Walton, Spalding, Butts, Cobb and Douglas counties. Travis Honeycutt, a family medicine physician originally from Chicago, said she hopes to bring about positive changes for the district from her seat in Washington, D.C. She has lived in Georgia’s 13th District for about 12 years.  More>>>

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Florida GOP’s Crist, Gallagher court black voters in September’s primary

July 24, 2006

 

Florida Attorney General Charlie Crist touts his civil rights credentials. State Chief Financial Officer Tom Gallagher talks about values and school vouchers.

The two Republican candidates for governor hope to win over black Republican voters, who could sway a close election. But they’re also taking the unusual step of quickly reaching out to the overall black electorate, which traditionally has overwhelmingly voted for Democratic candidates.

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Readers comment on article regarding Reginald Bohannon book “Coming Out of the Republican Closet”

July 23, 2006

Richard Says:

Mr Bohannon.. I do look forward to reading your book. However.. it comes as something of a shock to me that someone with even a CASUAL read of american history would think that the NAACP would in some way need to be educated about the Republican Party or its role in championing the end of slavery. After all.. most politically active blacks WERE members of the Republican Party into the 1950s when the support for the Party was almost nonexistent among WHITES who lived in the south… that is Florida, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Missouri, Lousiana, Arkansas, and Texas. Any child can open a history book and show you that several blacks served in the United States Senate in the post civil war era and they were all Republicans… in fact they were called RADICAL REPUBLICANS and if Rush Limbaugh had had a radio show then… he’d have spit out those words with the same contempt he says “LIBERAL” today(incidentally… why beat around George Bush… when you say Liberal you are actually saying “northeastern secular jew” or it’s equivalent).

We know the south was solidly Democratic and solidly racist and that the Northern Democrats generally maintained peace within the party by being mealymouthed, as they are today. on the very divisive and fundamental issues that face us. Meanwhile.. the Republican Party was mainly the party of the north and west… it abandoned it’s abolitionist and anti racist elements from the period including the election compromise of 1876 through the split in the party in 1912 when Teddy Roosevelt ran on his own Bull Moose Party ticket while his protege Taft ran with the support of big business creating the business wing of the Republican Party and the remnant of liberal and moderate Republicans who are being run out of the party nowadays like McCain, Snowe, Nelson Rockefeller et al.

Strom Thurmond who was a lifelong democrat through his siring an illegitimate black child, storming the beaches of Normandy to fight for freedom justice and democracy, then promptly returned home to run for Governor of South Carolina and then in 1948 ran a campaign for President on a Segregationist ticket in a challenge to the Democratic Party then being led by Roosevelt’s succesor Truman who apparently wasn’t QUITE racist enough for Thurmond’s liking. Thurmond, Jesse Helms and the various dixiecrats who serve as the villains in the civil rights movement were ALL Democrats it’s true. However… after their fellow dixiecrat Lyndon Johnson claimed he would see through the mealy mouthed northeastern Liberal President John Kennedy’s pledges on civil rights and then signed the civil rights act of 1964 and 1965 what did all those Southern Democrats do? Well.. as I hope I will see noted in your book. You will come to grips with the fact that the solid Democratic south is now solidly Republican. That the black political leaders who served as mayors of Atlanta and made changes which created that city, temporarily, as a black mecca, were indeed Democrats in the 1970s. That the last Democratic President before Bill Clinton was a Governor of Georgia who had spoken out against segregation. That Georgia had no Republican Party to speak of(except for the blacks who registered as republicans for decades after the party ceased being the “party of Lincoln” in 1912… as MOST blacks, if they COULD register to vote, registered Republican). Hopefully your book will be honest about the oft used Republican talking point “a greater percentage of Republicans voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 than Democrats and Lyndon Johnson thanked the Republicans who voted for the civil rights act as he couldn’t have gotten it through without them.”… well we all know about lies, damned lies and statistics! The Republicans made up a minority of the Senate and House at the time as their party almost did not exist in the SOLID SOUTH. The greater percentage of Republicans represented a LESSER NUMBER of actual Senators and Congressman as Democrats made up a wide majority of both houses and indeed NORTHERN DEMOCRATS and PRE-1965 REPUBLICANS did indeed stand together to support Civil Rights.

But WHY did Strom Thurmond, Jesse Helms, Trent Lott et al LEAVE the Democratic Party and all become Republicans after 1965? Was it the Democratic stance on the windfall profits tax or abortion? No… it was Civil Rights. The Republican Party went from being a minority party to near parity with the larger Democratic Party based on THE WHITE MALE RESPONSE TO LEGALLY ENFORCED EQUITY BY THE UNITED STATES FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. All the talking points in the world can’t overcome that truth. One need only look at what the Republican party does, emphasizes, activates for, and says.. to see behind it an agenda based on WHITE MALE RULE over all the Empire of the United States sees and surveys. That is the right-wing and republican parties disease and why black conservatives, no matter how well intentioned, spoken, or educated ultimately rest on a foundation of clay and why black americans who are indeed relatively traditional and conservative DO make a more or less correctly informed pull of that lever for Democrats. We may not like the variety of issues included under the Democratic tent… racist labor unions, communists, poorly thought out radicalisms, or militant gay activists… but we ALSO know that all of these things MUST be dealt with within a body politic where all people stand equal OR else it doesn’t make a difference WHAT any of us think. The black community.. perhaps reflexively if it errs… it errs on the side of EXPANSION of rights and openness of the political process, legislatures, and courts to those seeking that expansion. We may share a culture and christian tradition with the southern white man and get along with him well on a one to one basis, but we go 90% to 95% percent or BETTER voting against any agenda that makes him and his interests sovereign over all who come under the American umbrella. That is an honorable role for our people to play and while I feel we MUST indeed hear conservatism well and logically articulated, we do well to avoid ‘talking points’, talk radio, and bumper sticker so-called “conservative” philosophy being aimed into the american body politic by the Rush Limbaugh’s and Tony Snows of the world and their spiritual forebear Goebbels.


Offended by someone who appears to be a contradiction.

July 22, 2006

Source: negrophile.com

Q: You’re a representative of the more liberal wing of the party. Now, in come black elected officials Rep. Harold Ford Jr. (D-Tenn.) and Sen. Barak Obama (D-Ill.) with their sort of middle of the road approach and they appear to be gaining traction. Are you thinking about modifying your own approach? More>>>


Bush doesn’t measure up

July 22, 2006

PRESIDENT BUSH broke his boycott of the NAACP by copying the speech he gave to the nation’s oldest civil rights group as a candidate in 2000.

On Thursday, Bush said: “I understand that many African-Americans distrust my political party. . . . I consider it a tragedy that the party of Abraham Lincoln let go of its historic ties with the African-American community. . . . We need to challenge the soft bigotry of low expectations. . . . I understand that racism still lingers in America.”
In 2000, Bush said: “For my party, there is no escaping the reality that the party of Lincoln has not always carried the mantle of Lincoln. . . . While some in my party have avoided the NAACP and while some in the NAACP have avoided my party, I’m proud to be here. . . . I will confront another form of bias: the soft bigotry of low expectations. . . . Discrimination is still a reality, even when it takes different forms. Instead of Jim Crow, there’s racial redlining and profiling. Instead of separate but equal, there is separate and forgotten. Strong civil rights enforcement will be a cornerstone of my administration.”

Bush hoped he could plagiarize himself to an audience he treated for 5 1/2 years as separate and forgotten. Until Thursday, he was the only sitting president since Warren G. Harding more than 80 years ago not to address the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Bush’s top moment of success in that regard was when he said he would sign the extension of the Voting Rights Act. This was hardly courageous, as the Senate passed the extension 98 to 0 and the House passed it 390 to 33. More on Bush’s mind was blunting visceral anger at his Iraq debacle and domestic policies that have many Republican members of Congress at risk in the mid-term elections.

Anger seethed beneath the politeness. While Bush received strong applause on the voting act and for understanding the distrust of black voters toward his party, silence grew as Bush retreated to well-worn, but ill-funded initiatives such as education. He received a smattering of boos for pushing charter schools.

Many people in the audience were acutely aware that Bush barely touched on the NAACP’s core mission of equal rights. Bush failed to square his lament about African-Americans and Republicans when his own Justice Department deleted half of a massive report on racism among its attorneys, and his own Department of Health and Human Services attempted to delete all references to disparities and inequalities in healthcare. Bush did not mention why he backed white students at the University of Michigan who tried to kill affirmative action. He did not mention his Supreme Court and federal judicial appointees who oppose affirmative action and school busing.

His praise of the Voting Rights Act was, of course, the most ironic moment of his speech, considering how he gained the Oval Office with the massive disqualification of black ballots in Florida.

“I thought it was a good speech; he lost his luster and fire at the end,” said James Crowell, president of the Biloxi NAACP in Mississippi. “We’re still waiting for money to help us out from [Hurricane] Katrina. Even in removing rubbish from Katrina, minority contractors were at the end of hiring. The cost of a gallon of gasoline is almost the same as the minimum wage. Small school systems are dying from lack of funding as white families pull out. I haven’t seen anything from Bush where the rubber meets the road.”

Kenny Gwynn, president of the middle Tennessee chapter of the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists, and Paco Havard, president of the Maury County, Tennessee chapter of the NAACP, agreed.

“We don’t need separate charter schools; we need all our schools to be built up,” said Gwynn, a General Motors auto worker. “On jobs, we’re bleeding them overseas and everyone is worried about their pensions and healthcare.”

Havard added, “I hear hope in what Bush says, but don’t show me despair.”

Julian Bond, the NAACP’s chairman and the organization’s harshest critic of the Bush presidency, said he was happy Bush made his speech, but noted how the president failed to utter a single example of how the administration enforced civil rights. He said Bush still ranks among the lowest of modern presidents in that regard.

“It’s like a plumber addressing a carpenters’ convention,” Bond said. “The harsh reality of his presidency is one of low performance and low expectations.”

Derrick Z. Jackson’s e-mail address is jackson@globe.com.


More than 300 now dead in Lebanon – UN Security Council must protect civilians in Israel-Lebanon conflict

July 19, 2006

On the eighth day of Israel’s military campaign in Lebanon Wednesday, the
Lebanese death toll passed 300, almost all civilians.    [Full Story]

Amnesty International is calling on the UN Security Council to urgently adopt measures to protect civilians caught up in the deepening Israel-Lebanon conflict. Amnesty International condemns the continued attacks on civilians by both Israel and Hizbullah. Such attacks are a blatant breach of international humanitarian law and amount to war crimes.

Women in a refugee camp who have fled conflict in Africa
 


breakthough in the war on…uh….what exactly?

July 19, 2006

Source: tyrone takes america.com

when i saw this picture, i knew something was funny. i just could not take these guys. seriously as terrorists. but then again, anything is possible, so i kept an open mind….that is until i heard the details..

so let me get this straight….these guys had no weapons, no money, and no connections – in fact they were arrested them based on an fbi informant’s conversation with only one of them? sounds like bullshit if i ever heard it.

now i’m not saying that if someone allegedly says they would like to blow up the sears tower that we shouldn’t pay attention to it. but the funny thing is that, after 9/11 the fbi told us that they receive hundreds of terror threats per day and they have to determine which ones are credible….there have been more serious threats (like one uncovered a couple years back in Brooklyn) that never even made the news…so why is this the one that gets national press?

i hope people remember this kind of propaganda that the government spends it’s time creating the next time there is a real terror attack.